Culture-Hero

Culture

At Highlands, we have a passion for bringing out the best in brands.

Underlying our “We Can” attitude are our values, which serve as a compass for our behavior, planning, and actions. Living the Highlands values means we are entrepreneurial, collaborative, accountable, and we are navigators.
What does that mean for you?

We are Entrepreneurial.

Working with some of the world’s biggest brands and distributors, we are never complacent. Competition is fierce and we’re always looking for unexplored frontiers and new innovations to far surpass your expectations.

We are Collaborative.

At Highlands, we value our strategic partners and we put them to work for you. Actively engaging with stakeholders to share ideas, thoughts, and challenges, we create a synergistic whole that is greater than the sum of the parts. Through working together, we exceed the results you dreamed of and propel you to new heights.

We are Accountable.

We deliver measurable successes for your brand. We share in each other’s triumphs and take responsibility for our actions. This is how we prove our commitment to you, our customer, by following through on our promises.

We are Navigators.

The path from planning to product distribution can be lonely. With Highlands, you won’t be alone. Our ability to steer you on this path is our greatest asset. We are well-known in the industry and have long-standing relationships with the key players. Our trusted team has the know-how and expertise, and they know who to talk to and when.

Creating unrivaled intimacy between your brands and consumers is at the heart of our thinking. We will nurture your brand and help it grow quickly and cost effectively.
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Setting ourselves up to fail

May 30, 2017

This week… Run to the Stop Sign.

Setting ourselves up to fail?


I went jogging with my daughter this weekend.  I use the term “jogging” lightly as it’s mostly walking with a few jogs in between.

Keep in mind, she is a very fit 21-year old, and I am a semi-fit fifty-something (we don’t need to get more specific on either front).  In my mind, I had already determined, I would lag behind and she would win.

Close to a mile in, she challenges me, “let’s run to the stop sign.”  Instinctively, I say, “I don’t like to make goals… it just sets me up to fail.”  Did that really come out of my mouth?  It was exactly what I was thinking.  If I don’t actually set the goal, then I won’t fail. 

How often do we do that in business - avoid making forecasts or setting milestone goals - out of fear of not being able to achieve it?  We won’t feel as bad in our failure if we didn’t set out to do it in the first place.  Yet, will we ever achieve greatness without goals?

She asks me, “why do you stop yourself?”  It’s not that I’m so tired I can’t keep going.  It’s probably because I normally only go this far in one jog, or maybe because I’m bored and just stop?  Is that parallel to my comfort zone?  Maybe I can go a little longer.  Just because she’s 30 years younger doesn’t mean I can’t keep up.

I decided to change my mindset.  “Let’s run to the big yellow sign ahead.”  Keep running… you don’t have to stop… just a few feet more… I can do it!  And, guess what, I did. 

It’s the same in your business and professional life.  What are your limiting beliefs that hold you back?  What more can we accomplish when we set lofty goals, and confidently push through our comfort zone? 

Other than 10,000 steps on my Fitbit, this morning’s jog taught me to:

1.       Set milestone goals

2.       Change to a winning mindset

3.       Push yourself

4.       Surround yourself with people better than you - smarter, faster, fitter

And, then as we neared the end of our jog, she admits her legs hurt.  Yay!  I win!

Janet Collins, a strategic advisor in the office products industry and a long-time collaborator with Highlands.  She works with business leaders to develop growth strategies and mobilize teams to take action and achieve results. She's a coach who's been in your shoes, most recently as President of GMi Companies (Ghent, VividBoard and Waddell). 


Contact Janet at [email protected] or visit www.linkedin/in/collinsjanet.


Janet_Collins



Do what is right image

The time is always right to do what is right

May 8, 2017


I think it was Tom Hopkins who said sales is “the easiest, lowest paid job in the world, or the hardest, highest paid job”. I’ve probably misquoted the great man but the essence of it is, in my opinion, completely true.


The reference, I believe, was towards hard work and having to deal with rejection.  We all know that high activity rates tend to generate more sales.  We also know that until you ask “the question” you’ll never get a ‘yes’ or a ‘no’.  Many people are so scared of getting a ‘no’ they never ask “the question”.  Great salespeople will ask “the question” knowing full well they risk a ‘no’. And, rejection hurts…deep.


Because sales people are, of course, always looking for a ‘yes’ they tend to steer the sales process down the path that is most likely to get them an affirmative answer.  Even if it’s not necessarily the best thing for their customer.  I know; shock, horror!


This approach may, or may not, get you the sale. And, in the short term, everyone might be happy -  especially the salesperson.


However, we know that in the mid to long term this is not necessarily going to be right for either the salesperson’s company or their client.  Eventually something will go wrong, and then everyone dives into the contract detail and relationships fall apart.


I write this blog in the final stages of preparing for a big client pitch. The client wants to enter a new (to them), and highly competitive market with their existing brand proposition.  We’ve done extensive research on the client’s behalf and we think they need to make some fundamental changes.  One of those is to adopt a new brand for this market.  And, to complicate matters, they love their brand - of course they do.  We love their brand too, just not for this new market.


So, we have a dilemma.  Do we pitch for what we think is right, or do we pitch what we think they will say ‘yes’ to?


We really like the client and the people we work with, and would like to work with them for many years to come.


Easy then.  Pitch what we think is right.


Watch this space….